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borgqueenx
09-25-2011, 03:25
Is it 100% fluid or is it also usable on vertical glass and lenses?(will it drip of or stick to it)
Just wondering this before i purchase...

Jem
09-25-2011, 04:01
First contact isn't a spray. It comes in a small bottle with an integrated brush as part of the bottle cap.

It very easy to use on lenses set at any angle as the liquid is reasonably viscous.

You're worrying about nothing ;), first contact is an excellent product. Yes, it is quite expensive, but a small bottle will last a long time.

Hope this helps

Jem

dnar
09-25-2011, 08:18
Get the red version, it has little bit of red dye that makes it a little easier to see it once applied. Same cost from memory.

I can't speak highly enough of this stuff. Tip: don't leave it around if you have teenage daughters, they may think it's nail polish lol.

borgqueenx
09-25-2011, 09:30
Get the red version, it has little bit of red dye that makes it a little easier to see it once applied. Same cost from memory.

I can't speak highly enough of this stuff. Tip: don't leave it around if you have teenage daughters, they may think it's nail polish lol.
im 21 years of age :p
but thanks.

also thanks to you Jem, for the clear answer. i ordered a bottle of first contact for the dichro's and galvo's. the red colored version wich was about 2GBP more expensive.

Jem
09-25-2011, 09:33
You're very welcome :)

Glad I could help.

Jem

stanwax
09-26-2011, 01:41
Just to clear things up First Contact can be purchased in larger containers with a spray adaptor. I dont sell this as it does not suit our use for what is traditionally small optics. Its ideally suited to things such as telescope reflectors and is sprayed on in an even coat that means NO contact with the surface at all from a cleaning implement - just the film of polymer.
I can get this if there are any budding astronomers who have a use for it - just drop me an email

Rob

gashead
09-26-2011, 02:08
Tip: don't leave it around if you have teenage daughters, they may think it's nail polish lol.

Another Tip:

Don't leave it in the glovebox in your car on a hot day, otherwise the bottle may explode. (Speaking from personal experience)

dnar
09-26-2011, 02:36
Off topic slightly. When I first heard of First Contact, this image sprang to mind.

27600

borgqueenx
09-26-2011, 07:16
more like this:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-iNfsSPzgxDY/TXx_uzONA9I/AAAAAAAAADI/Cmd8Fz9p0ak/s1600/startrekborg42.jpg
they have alot of W's in those lasers, they cut through enterprises!
And they are all mine mine>:) Hence my username >:)

But a serious question: How long do i need to dry that first contact stuff or will it be obvious when its ready to remove?
then i just get a piece of tape and pull the film off that way?

Jem
09-26-2011, 07:40
But a serious question: How long do i need to dry that first contact stuff or will it be obvious when its ready to remove?
then i just get a piece of tape and pull the film off that way?

I have found that the longer you leave it the easier it is to remove. It usually dries fairly quickly as it is solvent based, a few minutes if you're in a hurry. If it doesn't come away easily first time, leave it a bit longer. If i'm cleaning the optics in my projector I usually apply the stuff on one evening and remove it the next evening ;)

Yes, just stick a bit of a sticky lable (or use adhesive tape) to one edge and gently pull, it should lift the first Contact coating with it and leave your optic perfectly clean :)

Jem