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Thread: I was thinking blue

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Default I was thinking blue

    Well, I'm not a laser builder, but I have been researching it, and I found out something interesting.

    Blue DPSS lasers are made almost the same as a green DPSS laser, but the crystals are different, sort of. You will start off with a 808nm pump, and then lase some Nd:YAG or Nd:YVO4, cool this down so you get a 946nm line, then double it with some LBO. Whoa, 473nm.

    I hope you guys can start producing some Blue lasers soon!..

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Southampton, UK
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    166

    Default

    Hi There

    Welcome to Photon Lexicon JayDC.

    I have been looking hard at the Sony BluRay diodes, they are rumored to have stock of over 1 million Pcs ready for the BluRay disks. These diodes are between 200 and 250 mw at 405 (violet blue), so thats how I belive amateur laserists will get cost effective blue lasers.

    You can go Argon, but they are not portable and pretty scarey in terms of heat output.

    The idea of modding a leadlight to produce blue would be great, lets hope it happens GIVE ME CHEAP COMPONENTS

    Gold
    Use APTZ to control your laser www.icode.co.uk/icatcher

  3. #3
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    Default

    I'm not sure that the ultra violet diodes are really worth anything to some one doing a laser show, although, I could be wrong.

    I'm not sure exactly how cold you need to get the Nd:YVO4, I'm sure TEC is the answer, but I heard that the temp control has to be very stable to get a solid blue line. Also LBO can be used to make green, instead of KTP.

    So I guess that blue is a cold green.

    From sams Faq:
    "What is the Difference Between Green and Blue DPSSFD Lasers?
    (From: Bob.)

    Well, a little, and a lot, depending on how you look at it. Green lasers are doubling the 1064 nm transition of Nd:YAG or Nd:YVO4, or some other similar host medium. The 946 nm line is what is being doubled in blue lasers, and 473 nm light is the result. Often, the choice for a Non-Linear Optical (NLO) crystal is different for the two lines. KTP is the crystal of choice normally for green, and LBO for blue. Also, the 946 nm line has a much smaller cross section for emission. This means lower efficiency and the 1064 line and even the weak 1319 nm line will try to compete with it, stealing energy. On top of that, the 946 line is self absorbing making the device a lot trickier to generate (like ruby, this is a case where the laser medium is actually somewhat opaque to the frequency of light the laser is trying to operate at, where as YAG is almost perfectly transparent at 1064 nm). "

    more reading at:
    http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/laserssl.htm#ssldps

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Florida
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    Default

    Hi Gold,
    Thats what I am waiting for here as well..
    Sony is already Incorporating those inside their new
    HDTV cam ...
    Sony also said it had decided to incorporate a Blu-ray drive into the PS3

    woohoo!!! I cant wait...

    They brought a few HDTV cams and a lap-top editor
    by work about a month ago and boy they ARE nice..
    storage capablity is so big...
    But so is the price... I dunno if we will buy them
    I hope so....
    But I dont think I'll be able to pull those diodes out for quite
    some time as...They are warranting them for like 5yrs..
    And the whole assembly is in module form
    So, when it goes bad, they just replace it..

    Im guessing the Sony folks want the diodes back, HEHE..

    *^_^*
    "My signature has been taken, so Insert another here"
    http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/laserfaq.htm
    *^_^* aka PhiloUHF

  5. #5

    Default

    I really dont want to be a buzzkill here, i just dont want to see people get worked up for nothing.

    Sony at one point said they would be putting blueray diodes in their ps3s, so thats great however unless i missed something it will be a read only device so higher powers like 200 are almost completely of the question.

    Same thing in old cd burners when they were new, they had a crummy 20mW 785nM diode for reading and a seperate high power diode for burning.

    Though if the PS3 can read cds, dvds, and whatever they are going to call the final media you could probably get a couple cool diodes out of it.

    I might be there opening day to get one... Im going to love the looks on peoples faces when i tell them "nope, not going to play it, going to tear it open"

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spec
    I might be there opening day to get one... Im going to love the looks on peoples faces when i tell them "nope, not going to play it, going to tear it open"
    Then take it back to the shop, and say.. "I think mine is broken, it won't play discs. Can I exchange this for one that works."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Florida
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    Default

    I can see it now..
    Tech at sony getting in a shipment of PS3's a month right after
    box is released ...

    Opens them up and finds all the blue diodes missing..
    Scratches head :roll: and wonders if they ever had them!!!


    *^_^*
    "My signature has been taken, so Insert another here"
    http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/laserfaq.htm
    *^_^* aka PhiloUHF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Aalen, Germany
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    15

    Default

    "I was thinking blue" ... me too

    Photos at www.laserblog.de

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