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Thread: rgb layout plans

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Default rgb layout plans

    hi, could anyone post some typical layout guides for an rgb set up.
    (hand drawn beam paths / mirrors / scanners etc.
    i've just got my single colour greeny up and running and already
    i'm thinking of getting a blue laser. i know some layouts are
    in the gallery but not always clear re beam paths etc.
    Also, i presume it would it be better to get analogue modulation
    so the intensity can be controlled.
    this is a really useful forum !! well done !
    dave321

  2. #2
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    Charleston, SC
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    Dave;

    The beam path will depend on how you plan to combine them. If you're going to use two separate dichros, then you'll have a beam path that looks something like this:
    Code:
       R    B
       |    |
    G--\----\----W-----S
                       |
                       O
    Where R, G, and B are your Red, Green, and Blue lasers. The two '\' symbols are your dichros. the W is the resultant white light beam. The S is your scanner set, and the O is the output beam.

    If you use a trichro to combine your lasers, then your beam path will look like this:
    Code:
       R       G       B
        \      |      /
          \    |    /
            \  |  /
              \|/
               T
               |
               |
               W
               |
               |
               S-----O
    The only new symbol is the T, which represents the trichro. The other symbols are the same as the drawing above. Note that the angles will be slightly different from the crude 45 degrees to either side of the green that you see above. Here's what a trichro looks like when it's lined up correctly.

    Note also that you can change the order of the lasers in the first layout (the one that uses dichros instead of the trichro), so long as you have the correct dichros. (ie: you could have the red one first, and the green one last if you wanted.) But remember that blue photons are the most expensive, and the red ones are the next most expensive. Green is cheap, so it makes sense to put it at the begining of the path, knowing that you'll loose more green since it will pass through two dichros on the way to the scanner. Putting the red in the middle means it has to pass through just one dichro, and the blue at the end just needs to reflect off (as opposed to pass through) one dichro, so it will suffer the least loss.

    Any of that make sense? (I know - it's late...)

    Adam

  3. #3

    Default

    heres a rough overkill idea i threw together a while ago... not for the squeamish...

    Ive got a few more drawings around here ill have to find.


  4. #4
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    That's a pretty involved layout... I'd like to know how much that last dichro is going to cost. (Pass 660nm, 532 nm, and 473 nm, but reflect 635 nm?) Ouch... That's going to be quite expensive - if it's even doable. (And what would the loss be?)

    But drop off the 635 nm diode, and the rest of the design works.

    Adam

  5. #5

    Default

    The first one I ever drew (ahh the memories)



    To answer your question: Analog modulation is really helpful. You can get more than 7 colors reliably that way and it has the added benefit of being able adjust lines on the fly.... Say one file calls for a variable intensity green laser and the next file calls for full-on white modulation.

  6. #6
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    thanks guys, thats really useful, gives me plenty to think about appreciate your help
    dave321

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