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Thread: How can I fix (do it yourself) this IPG fiber laser?

  1. #51
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    UCSB
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    Usually the fibers would be 'fusion spliced' into a fiber combiner. For simple jobs where you just want to get a beam out of the fiber you can just cleave the fiber tip and then mount the fiber in some sort of collimator. For use in a laser marker it would probably be best to terminate the fiber in a connector of some sort (SMA would be the cheapest) so that the fiber can be mounted in a standard collimator.

    For simple testing you can strip the fibers with a razor blade and cleave the glass fiber with a carbide (or similar) scribe. The quality of the beam won't be great but it will at least prevent the fiber from melting. Anything more advanced than that gets expensive quickly, for example a precision fiber cleaver costs about $500 and a fusion splicer costs $5k and up. Even just the tools for doing manual fiber termination will run a few hundred dollars and for production type tooling (which you will probably want if you are going to try and terminate hundreds of diodes) easily get into the tens of thousands.

  2. #52
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    Oct 2012
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    Germany
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    ... my "cleaved" fibers did't survive more than 20 Watts for longer than 5 minutes ... any dust particle or micro-fissure will start to melt the fiber tip!

    So I'm cutting+breaking (cleaving) them to length, insert and glue into a FSMA connector and polish the tip with down to RA 20 nm ...

    Viktor

  3. #53
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    As long as you are careful to get a decent quality cleave and keep the end clean (wipe the fiber down with IPA after stripping, but before cleaving, then never allow it to touch anything that might contaminate it) you should be able to get stable operation for a diode like this. Even on the 50w ones I have used this approach without trouble, but of course it is not the most convenient way to operate the system. The real fun starts when you are trying to couple power _in_ to a fiber, then it becomes important to worry about the thermal management. For a 105um fiber a freestanding and properly cleaved end should be good for about 100-200w before it starts to show signs of trouble. Highest power density I have ever tried with a freestanding cleaved fiber was a 40um core fiber with a 100w average power which worked fine.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    2

    Default JPT YDFL

    Quote Originally Posted by GregR View Post
    My apologies for posting this question within the wrong category on photonlexicon--it has been more than a year since I read the categories.

    The YLP brochure says that the fiber length changes with pulse power. My interpretation is that this means the factory cuts the fiber to the length best suited for a particular output pulse energy.

    The brochure goes on to say that the fiber is terminated with a collimator. My interpretation here is that the output coupler is upstream, prior to this fiber connection.



    For the YLP product brochure says,
    Standard YLP Series Ytterbium laser modules provide a
    pulsed output beam with average output power from 5 to
    100 Watts and pulse width from 80 to 500ns. Laser output is
    provided by a 1 to 8 meter (depends on energy per pulse)
    metal-sheathed optical fiber cable terminated by beam col-
    limator providing a near diffraction limited (M2<2) beam
    with diameter from 2 to 15mm.



    Can I customise frequency watt ratio?

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    2

    Default Jpt fiber source

    Quote Originally Posted by krazer View Post
    Post some pictures of the inside of the laser, in particular the piece of optical fiber before the spot where it has been cut and we can survey the damage
    Hi Krazer

    Can I increase watt against 10 Khz frequency???

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