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Thread: Projector safety compliance

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Default Projector safety compliance

    Hey guys

    I'd like to understand what a projector needs to have to be FCC compliant. Without access to the standards directly I'm a little usure what the full list is.

    I know for example there needs to be an emission light. Is this only for when a beam is output, or when the system has power and could produce output?

    E-stop with manual reset. How is the reset meant to be implemented? As in, is it remote with the e-stop button or on the projector (hard if it is on trussing).

    Key switch > what is this for, ie is it replacing a power on button to the unit?

    What other considerations are there?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    first thing is its not the FCC its the FDA (CDRH)

    https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scrip...cfm?FR=1040.10

    https://www.fda.gov/downloads/aboutf.../ucm081592.pdf


    start with those links

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Default

    Thank you. .

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    2,147,488,768

    Default

    I'd like to add some more to the *excellent* links provided above.

    21 CFR 1040.10 does reference this, but in case you missed it, you'll also want to read 21 CFR 1040.11

    Another important document is Laser Notice 50, as it makes it easier to build a projector that is compliant for both the USA and European markets.

    Regarding your specific questions, the emission light denotes that the projector is in an operational state and may output laser light at any time when the appropriate control signals are applied. It does not necessarily mean that the projector is currently outputting light, just that it is capable of doing so. (Some laser product manufacturer's call this the "run" state or the "enabled" state, as opposed to "stopped" or "safe" state.)

    The E-stop has to be accessible from the operator's location, which precludes mounting it on the projector or the truss. In fact it's actually referred to as a "remote" E-stop for exactly this reason.

    The class IV reset can be implemented in many different ways. The final decision is left to the laser product manufacturer who is certifying the projector as compliant. (Note that in order to certify a laser product as being compliant you need to have a laser product manufacturer's variance first.) Read through 21 CFR 1040.10 and .11 for the details, but in general the reset mechanism must ensure that any projector startup is the result of an operator-commanded action. (Startup being defined as the transition from a "safe" state to a "run" or "enabled" state.)

    The classic example is when the inspector tells you to enable the projector and start displaying a pattern. Then he will disconnect the ILDA cable. Usually the projector shuts down when this happens. (It better, or you just failed the inspection!) But then he plugs the cable back in. If the projector starts back up and begins projecting again, that is also a fail condition. Remember: any projector start up must be *commanded* by the operator.

    The keyswitch is required as a means of locking the projector in the "off" or "safe" state. The key must remain captive when in the "on" position; it can only be removed in the "off" position. This ensures that no one can start the projector while the operator is adjusting the aperture mask, or the mounting clamps, or doing any other task that places him in the line of fire. It also prevents locking the projector in the "on" or "enabled" position and then taking the key away.

    Where the keyswitch is located is again up to the laser product manufacturer who files the product report, but you need to be able to defend your placement decision. Most manufacturers use dual keyswitches - one on the projector and one on the remote E-stop box - as this provides the greatest safety. Note that both must be in the on position for the projector to function. (And then you still have the class-IV reset to actually enable or start the projector.)

    All that being said, this is just the tip of the iceberg. There are a *TON* of other requirements that must be met beyond the few listed above. Believe it or not, one of the most common reasons for a laser product report being rejected is LABELING. (Crazy, right?) Another common problem is interlocks. You also need to provide supporting documents for all major components used in the projector. A typical product report submission runs at least 100 pages, and some advanced designs can exceed 300 pages.

    The "guide to filing a laser product report" that VJ AIWAZ linked to above is a great resource. Once you've read through 21 CFR 1040.10 and .11, start working your way through the guide. That will give you a good overview of what it takes to get a laser projector certified in the US.

    Adam

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Laurel, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by buffo View Post
    Another important document is Laser Notice 50, as it makes it easier to build a projector that is compliant for both the USA and European markets.
    Laser notice 56 does even more to harmonize compliance standards. It's still in the draft phase but CDRH has been requesting manufacturers bear it in mind when designing new products and filing product reports. https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Medica.../UCM592775.pdf

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    I have a query related to 1040.10
    section (f) (5) (iv)
    Any visible signal required... ...shall be clearly visible through protective eyewear designed
    specifically for the wavelength(s) of the emitted laser radiation.



    In this instance, an LED would not be suitable as generally it would not be visible if wearing eyewear of one or the other wavelengths. What would be a good soltution for this?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Typically that's satisfied by using a white LED. They're typically wide enough that narrow band laser glasses won't filter them completely.

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