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Thread: What is this called?

  1. #1
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    Default What is this called?

    Can someone tell me what this is called and possibly who makes it? I know it changes the beam direction
    90 degrees, that about it. It has a crystal in it and it is powered I think to move the crystal.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20200618_145001.jpg  

    20200618_145010.jpg  


  2. #2
    mixedgas's Avatar
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    its not a crystal, it is a dielectric mirror coated for red laser light for a x-ray film printer. It is on the shaft of a galvanometer scanner. (GALVO). As for who, can't see enough to tell from that photo.

    Steve
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  3. #3
    mixedgas's Avatar
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    You will need +/- 24 volt power supplies rated for more then 2.5 amps to power it, and the control signal will range from minus five volts to plus five volts, with zero volts being NO deflection.

    It is a copy of what is now a very generic galvo type made in China. The driver amplifier is a variant of a Cambridge 6850 circuit with the LM10 being replaced by a modern LM3886 as a power op-amp to drive the coil in the Galvo. It looks like they have changed the pinout of the power and input connector.

    DO NOT REMOVE THE JUMPERS OR ADJUST ANY OF THE POTENTIOMETERS. Trust me on that.

    The positive power input can be traced with an Ohmmeter from the connector to the input leg of the LM7815 regulator. The negative power input can be traced from the connector to the input leg of the LM7915 regulator. The Ground connection should be fairly obvious, but should also verified with an Ohm meter.

    One of the two remaining pins will be the input, and the other will be either another ground or an output of the position feedback signal. In very rare cases the remaining pin will be an enable signal, usually activated by grounding it.

    The terminal that says "POS" is the raw signal from the feedback sensor and is used with an oscilloscope for tuning the servo loops.

    Good Luck...

    The amplifier will need a large heatsink to keep it cool when running. Do not overdrive the input, start with a very small , very low voltage, signal.


    Steve
    Last edited by mixedgas; 06-19-2020 at 04:51.
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  4. #4
    mixedgas's Avatar
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    The attached, outdated, Cambridge Technology , Inc Schematic is what the circuitry is inspired from.


    Steve
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails galvo amp 6850.gif  

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  5. #5
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    He was just a seller looking to id the piece for listing it on Ebay.

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