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Thread: Phosphorescent paint

  1. #1
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    Default Phosphorescent paint

    Hello.
    I like to tune my laser towards UV and create animations with phosphorescent paint.
    I love the phosphor traces from a oscilloscopes...
    Does any one have a particular brand that they find optimal.
    Its hit or miss experimenting with random formulas.

    >United Nuclear Europium Ultra Glow in The Dark Phosphorescent Paint

    Has any one had any experience with this brand?
    Thanks .
    D

  2. #2
    Bradfo69's Avatar
    Bradfo69 is online now Pending BST Forum Purchases: $47,127,283.53
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    I don't know about that particular brand but... I will tell you you won't be able to do much with it - at this point. There are lots of people doing some pretty cool stuff with glow in the dark paint but, you need a projector with the diodes to make it react. Your Optlaser projector has (I'm guessing) 445nm for blue, 520nm for green and 638nm for red. For the glow in the dark UV reactive stuff, you need a diode that is near UV. The common one used is 405nm. Most people build a projector with the 405 diodes in them for this type of experimenting. There were some cheap Chinese projectors out there that used to use 405 which is really violet for their blue in their projectors but, it's pretty uncommon. Good news is 405 diodes are cheap and... it's all you need. You don't need to deal with red and green so, you can throw together a pretty simple projector for UV work for not a lot of money. I know being new, that sounds like perhaps a big job but, its really not that difficult to learn even when new. You'll need scanners, the diode and mount for it, the diode driver, a couple power supplies, a case to put it all in and, the wiring can be made simple with a few different ez projector wiring kits out there. Rob Staney (stanwax on the forum) has a great one in his store.

    Doesn't need to be grand and glorious.... we've seen people build them in metal lunchboxes, hard sided carry on luggage, grey plastic electrical boxes from Home Depot or, even just screwed to a piece of wood.
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  3. #3
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    Default Great info.

    Very cool.
    Appreciated the info on the 405's.
    Another area to investigate.
    Best!
    D

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradfo69 View Post

    Doesn't need to be grand and glorious.... we've seen people build them in metal lunchboxes, hard sided carry on luggage, grey plastic electrical boxes from Home Depot or, even just screwed to a piece of wood.


    Don't forget my James Bond Projector

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #5
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    Be careful if you get a 405nm laser. You can't see that wavelength very well. But it is the most damaging to the cornea and lens of your eyes. It might not look all that bright but it can be dangerous.
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  6. #6
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    Super cool double O.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradfo69 View Post
    I don't know about that particular brand but... I will tell you you won't be able to do much with it - at this point. There are lots of people doing some pretty cool stuff with glow in the dark paint but, you need a projector with the diodes to make it react. Your Optlaser projector has (I'm guessing) 445nm for blue, 520nm for green and 638nm for red. For the glow in the dark UV reactive stuff, you need a diode that is near UV. The common one used is 405nm. Most people build a projector with the 405 diodes in them for this type of experimenting. There were some cheap Chinese projectors out there that used to use 405 which is really violet for their blue in their projectors but, it's pretty uncommon.
    I would disagree this is UV paint with 460nm blue, and while not as good as 405nm it still gives very cool efffects





    And the paint I used is Click image for larger version. 

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    leading in trailing technology

  8. #8
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    i use the fast glow paint from risk reactor.

    https://www.riskreactor.com/categori...ow-paints.html






    Quote Originally Posted by Dbunny View Post
    Hello.
    I like to tune my laser towards UV and create animations with phosphorescent paint.
    I love the phosphor traces from a oscilloscopes...
    Does any one have a particular brand that they find optimal.
    Its hit or miss experimenting with random formulas.

    >United Nuclear Europium Ultra Glow in The Dark Phosphorescent Paint

    Has any one had any experience with this brand?
    Thanks .
    D
    suppose you're thinkin' about a plate o' shrimp. Suddenly someone'll say, like, plate, or shrimp, or plate o' shrimp out of the blue, no explanation. No point in lookin' for one, either. It's all part of a cosmic unconciousness.

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