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Thread: New format for laser shows - time to upgrade the show production

  1. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheHermit View Post
    Yes, if I were still pro, my rig would be nearly the same as yours. But, now I'm low dollar, high quality (subject to availability) DIY.
    I hear you! It has taken me years to amass the hardware and software to get to where I am. Going low dollar is a necessity sometimes! High quality, that's the key and given your background, I have no doubt the quality of what you create will be top notch!

    Your lumia projector looks great.
    Thank you! That, too, has taken a long time to get going. I eagerly look forward to seeing your completed system. Completed... when is anything ever complete among laserists????


    "DMX driven scan-glass"🤔 Don't know what that is, but if you've got 'em, reckon I probably need a few. Would that be something similar to the liquid crystals that we used to fuzz the beam in 'Set the Controls to the Heart of the Sun', but now being used for 'safe' crowd (cat) scanning?
    Thanks for the edumication.
    😎
    Actually, just pieces of glass and effects that are moved into the beam path for each scan-head. I have a couple of pieces of fuzz glass, some lenticulars, diffraction gratings, star line filters, and fresnels. Mine are on servos though. They aren't very fast. I think Laserium and AVI projectors used pneumatics or strong solenoids to move the scan glass quickly in front of the image galvos.
    Those who fail to grasp art are the ones who criticize it.

  2. #172
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    Laserium used solenoids. There have been pictures on here before of Laserium's scan glass system, and the front side is in the documentary. It had a 1/8 steel rod supported at each end with bearings that passed from the front on the head to the back side. There were 3 nested brass tubes riding coax around the steel rod. In the back of the projector were three cylindrical solenoids that attached to a lever clamped on each of the brass tubes for mechanical advantage. There was a another aluminum link that attached the lever and the solenoid. the link allowed for the mix of straight line movement of the solenoid and the rotational motion of the lever. On the scan through side there were originally brackets clamped on the brass tubes and the scan glasses were screwed onto the brackets. When we started doing different shows in the same night/week we went to a clever spring loaded quick release scan glass holder.

    AVI used pneumatic actuators
    "There are painters who transform the sun into a yellow spot, but there are others who, with the help of their art and their intelligence, transform a yellow spot into the sun." Pablo Picasso

  3. #173
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    Laserium used rotary solenoids for the Lumia pickoffs originally. And in the Mark IV a single big rotary solenoid that moved the single scan glass tray.
    "There are painters who transform the sun into a yellow spot, but there are others who, with the help of their art and their intelligence, transform a yellow spot into the sun." Pablo Picasso

  4. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by laserist View Post
    Laserium used solenoids. There have been pictures on here before of Laserium's scan glass system, and the front side is in the documentary. It had a 1/8 steel rod supported at each end with bearings that passed from the front on the head to the back side. There were 3 nested brass tubes riding coax around the steel rod. In the back of the projector were three cylindrical solenoids that attached to a lever clamped on each of the brass tubes for mechanical advantage. There was a another aluminum link that attached the lever and the solenoid. the link allowed for the mix of straight line movement of the solenoid and the rotational motion of the lever. On the scan through side there were originally brackets clamped on the brass tubes and the scan glasses were screwed onto the brackets. When we started doing different shows in the same night/week we went to a clever spring loaded quick release scan glass holder.

    AVI used pneumatic actuators
    Thank you for the clarification. I know I had seen both on here.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheHermit View Post
    I didn't actually discover rotary solenoids, until seeing them being used on Holoco's projectors. They had a solid clunk that was really annoying during conferences.
    That's the reason why I used servos. They are not fast but I could work around that. For an intimate living room laser show, rotaries and even linear solenoids are just too loud!
    Those who fail to grasp art are the ones who criticize it.

  5. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by absolom7691 View Post
    That's the reason why I used servos. They are not fast but I could work around that. For an intimate living room laser show, rotaries and even linear solenoids are just too loud!
    Yes, agreed. I used to extend one side of the X/Y mount to add servo mounting screws, as a single block w/o additional mounting. Nice and compact. Also, a single servo can provide multiple effects ports on a disc, instead of needing complicated concentric shafts, with linkages and bearings.
    Although the Laserium projector's solenoids were fast, the arc of the diff gratings being inserted was still noticeable. Then, there's also the problem of where to locate multiple solenoids, mounts levers, etc. inside today's tight LD projectors.
    Some limited tilting of linear diff gratings can also be achieved with servos. But, again scanners can already project rotating network of beams, in any color and density.
    IMO, the beauty of lumia is the slow moving intricate interference patterns. That requires a small beam, whereas a fast scanned beam destroys it into a blur. No offence to all the blur fans out there, of course.
    Personally, I loved the break in 'Tank' when the lumia was removed from in front of the scanners, with the clean 'krypton cloud' background and sharp dots racing around the dome. Same with the simplicity of 'The Danube's waltzing lissajous ballet. Ivan was a master of show dynamics; from the exploding burn blast-off, to the angelic chorus, to the wild Tank, to the peaceful Danube... an emotional rollercoaster ride, just like a good movie.
    Less is more. For example, why attempt to project imagery, while using fog to illuminate crowd scans that only distract from the projected imagery? Sure, quick beam zaps are great for accenting drum riffs, but is constant sensory overload the objective? What's left for the encore?
    Okay, point taken... or made? I'll shut up, now.
    <end of rant>
    😎
    Last edited by TheHermit; 10-15-2022 at 11:24.
    What goes around, comes around. Most folks reflect one's light, yet silently absorb darkness, the invisible harm we inflict upon ourselves.

  6. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheHermit View Post
    Less is more. For example, why attempt to project imagery, while using fog to illuminate crowd scans that only distract from the projected imagery? Sure, quick beam zaps are great for accenting drum riffs, but is constant sensory overload the objective? What's left for the encore?
    I couldn't be more aligned with this statement. Don't get me wrong, I love beams. They certainly have their place but today's game seems to be, "Let's see how many projectors we can cram into an installation to get MOAR BEAMZ!!!" I actually love the old school beam tables. Fixed beams that would hit bounce mirrors around the venue. That spiderweb lattice that would cycle through was pretty awesome. As you said though, used sparingly. Beams get boring very quickly because it's a one-trick-pony. Beams or fans, that's all there is. So, a quick beam flash here and there is a nice addition and quite dazzling when used strategically.
    Those who fail to grasp art are the ones who criticize it.

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