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Thread: Goggles?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    85

    Default Goggles?

    What on earth is class Ii lasers? Draper have goggles to protect from it.

    http://www.diytools.co.uk/diy/Main/P...roductID=29766
    A lovely childhood. Just me my mother and the voices.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,478

    Default

    Class II (2). Visible laser light up to 1 mW. Those goggles look like nothing in particular, there's no stated design wavelength, and the most likely, red, isn't going to be blocked well by those. Probably not much good for near IR either. They'd work against low power green and blue.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Omaha, NE
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    769

    Default

    Here's a topic that has my attention (as a new guy)- it seems like most goggles are rated for a particular wavelength. What do most guys do for eye protection when working with an RGB projector? Get 3 goggles and work with one color at a time while aligning? Is there a set of safety goggles that spans a wide range of wavelengths? I am starting with lower power to get started, but I guarantee I will be craving more power in the not-so-distant future, and I am old enough to realize that I only have one set of eyes to last me the rest of my life!
    Thanks, Mike


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    2,147,489,073

    Cool

    It's tricky. I own a set of argon goggles that are good for blue and green, and another set that will attenuate red. However, most of the time the goggles aren't needed. Obviously when you are watching a show you don't need them, and when you are aligning the optics on your table you normally have the power dialed way back on your lasers. (This assumes you have analog blanking though.)

    If you only have TTL blanking, then it gets tricky. There are goggles out there that have narrow filters that block all three colors, but they're expensive. But you're right - wearing argon goggles won't help you if you get a red beam in the eye... (That's why I turn down my lasers when I align the optics. I normally have between 1 and 1.5 volts on the blanking rail when I'm moving the dichro baseplates or adjusting the laser table heights.)

    Note that once you get your alignment all dialed in, normally you can just tweak it a little by looking at a test pattern on the wall. You'd only be adjusting the far-field alignment, but assuming your near field is close you'll be fine. For this sort of quick adjust before a show I don't bother to lower the power. (I also keep my head well away from the scanners though.)

    These days I only wear the goggles when my eyes have to be right down near the table and the risk of a stray beam is high, or when I'm playing with new mirrors or galvos on an optical breadboard... (Never know when you might get a stray reflection then, so it's best to be safe.)

    Adam

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