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Thread: Rgb White Balance

  1. #1
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    Default Rgb White Balance

    the proper (mathematical) specification for a perfect white balance for a ~600mW RGB (@635) is-
    R- 252mW (635nm)
    G- 150mW (532nm)
    B- 192mW (473nm)

    i know im short about 3-4mW here. i didnt go down to decimal points in powers (252.8...etc...etc...)

    my question is-

    if i do-
    R- 300mW (635)
    G- 150mW (532)
    B- 150mW (473)

    is it going to look good? i know it wont be a perfect white balance. and prob on the green heavy side. but this is going to be a club install. so, mostly beam stuff. will the average "layperson" notice the power differences? in other words, most of us here as laserists would probably notice the green heavy aspect. but will the average person notice ya think??

    and obviously, at *WHITE* its going to be a lil more of a greenish white right? again, to the avg person, its going to look *white* right??

    -Marc

  2. #2
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    Lightbulb

    You should have a fairly good white there. If you are going all analog you can dial it down a little. I'd say 100G:150B:300R (635) would be a good balance, so you are not off too much. You may notice a little green tint. My projector is running 175G:75B:175R and the high power white is saturated with green but it still looks "white". I'd say dialed down for a good balance it is running 75G:75B:175R and that is with 660nm red.
    Love, peace, and grease,

    allthat... aka: aaron@pangolin

  3. #3
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    Default

    what if i keep it all at full power? (300, 150, 150)

    it IS all analog. but might as well give the client all theyre paying for. meaning not dial any powers back. again, to you and i- we would prob notice the differences. but will joe smith in some club notice it? im guessing no!?!?

    all that which-

    do you have vids/pics of yours in action??

    -Marc

  4. #4
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    Lightbulb

    It will look fine, even to us. I would only dial it back it you were going to do some graphics and need to get that perfect white.

    Here is one video. I only have a few with this green and blue, most have one of a couple different greens and a slightly lower powered blue, but I always try to balance the white fairly good, so most of my video's the green is close to 50 or so mW, 75 with the new one. There is only a 10 to 15 mW difference in blues.

    If you click, more videos by this user you can see all of them I have uploaded.

  5. #5
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    Cool

    Your average club goer will not notice. I've seen systems with truely awful color balance that were still crowd pleasers. (Like 500 mw of 635, 200 mw of 473, and a fucking full watt of 532, and the club patrons still thought it was "cool" even though *everything* looked green...)

    Bottom line: most club goers will be drunk anyway, so as long as you have bright beams, they'll be happy. Color balance is more important for graphics than beams anyway. But even then, laserists are more apt to notice lousy color balance than your average shmuck off the street. (They'll be like, "How do you get white light out of a laser? I thought they only made one color?") And that's if you find someone that actually knows a little bit about lasers to start with.

    I like to get the color balance really close because I like the beautiful range of blended colors that I can create in my living room. But that's not the primary objective of a club laser...

    Adam

  6. #6
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    Default

    My RGB is built up of:

    350mw 635
    320mw 473
    312mw 532

    And the white balance with all lasers running flat out looks fine. The only issue I have with it is that the 635 is far more divergent than the other two, so some effects have a slight red tinge to them as you can see in the second picture..
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCN0736.JPG  

    DSCN0765.JPG  


  7. #7
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    Default

    As Buffo quite rightly says, colour balance becomes far more sensitive when it comes to graphics..

  8. #8
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    Default

    thanks gentlemen!

    and "insanity," that first pic of the tunnel is absolutely gorgeous!! it looks fake. ( i know it isnt, its just sooo rich in color!!) good job!

    buffster-
    (yes, i just called you buffster! lol)
    thanks as always with your valued input! im speccing this out at-

    R- 300 (635)
    G- 150 (523)
    B- 150 (473)

    i think im gonna leave it there. i was re-considering back to mathematical specs, but being a club, like all of you have said, this is going to be 90% beams. any graphics is going to be viewed by 500 wasted people who wont know violet from brown anyway! LOL.

    -Marc

  9. #9
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    Default

    In my scanner I have 50mw 532nm, 185mw 660nm, 70mw 473nm and the balance is about perfect. But, keep in mind that this is at the laser source. The dichros and galvo mirrors unevenly attenuate them so at the point where the beams are exiting the galvos they are completely different. I am not sure what those levels are but far from those stated above. Just keep that in mind.

  10. #10
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    Default

    You know, this will be a great experiement for FLEM II. We will adjust someones projector for a white that everyone at FLEM II can agree on, then measure the power of each laser and see what we come up with, so we can have a "real life" ratio.

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