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Thread: ND-YAG 100 + Watt Laser on LabX auction

  1. #1
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    Default ND-YAG 100 + Watt Laser on LabX auction

    Ladies & Gents,

    I have posted what appears to be a complete , unused ND-YAG laser FA on LabX. This laser doesn't include the cabinet and is suitable for Industrial or scientific applications. It could be frequency doubled or tripled with some of the LBO crystals I have for sale.
    See " http://www.labx.com/v2/adsearch/Deta...?adnumb=349312 " for details on auction # 349312 and good luck bidding.

    Rick
    Profile Redacted by Admin @ 04.24.2010

  2. #2

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    Hi Rick,

    Do you have a model number for the system and is there any instruction manual included? Also, is there provision within the resonator for intracavity doubling (i.e. KTP crystal and oven), and do you have any specification for the Q-switch (specifically, is it HR for 1064 and AR for 532)?

    sonaluma

  3. #3
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    Hi Sonaluma,

    There is no documentation to go along with the ND-YAG laser unfortunately. The q-switch is model 5100-45 which appears to be for 1064 nm from specs I've been able to find in Laser Focus World buyers guide. I do not have an oven for heating non linear crystals for Non critical phase matching purposes.What you see in the pictures is what you get. All cables and connectors appear to be there. In order to frequency double intra-cavity you would have to change the optics ( HR & OC ). Lee laser use HR & OC optics at 100% reflectivity for 1064nm so no pump power is lost. They include an HR coating at 100% and around 90% for the OC at 532 nm. CVI can make those custom optics for you If that's what you intend .
    Lee Laser claim to get over 85% efficiency using a q-switch with intra cavity doubling of ND-YAG at 1064 nm.
    I have the original packing boxes and total packed weight is about 230 Lbs for 3 boxes.
    Hope this helps.

    Rick
    Profile Redacted by Admin @ 04.24.2010

  4. #4
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    St. Louis, MO - US
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    I worked on a similar system at Honeywell with friend of mine last year - I was surprised how easy they are to align. It was used to mark wafers at their semiconductor facility. I believe it was a Wafermark II from GSI Lumonics. (Similar in the fact that they were both qswitched YAGs - the frame looks similar at least).

    Any idea how much are the rod and lamp are when they need to be replaced and what is the typical life expectancy?



    Phil

  5. #5
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    Hi Phil,

    It could very well have been earmarked for the Wafermark Laser by Lumonics but I'm not familiar with that particular model.This ND-YAG laser is marked Engineering and I think it was fo R & D purposes. I purchased it from Lumonics at auction when they sold off their assets ( after they merged "got screwed" with GSI who closed down the former head office in Ottawa, Ont, Canada & dispersed assets ).
    The arc lamps are considered a consummable and usually last about 200 hours but depends on how hard you drive them . The rod suffers from solarization eventually and can be repolished and reused but I have no Idea how many hours before this maintenance cycle occurs.
    I presume you used a He-Ne laser to align the ND-YAG laser then an IR viewer to get it lasing and final alignment and walking the mirrors while measuring with an analog laser power meter.
    Hope this helps.
    Rick
    Profile Redacted by Admin @ 04.24.2010

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaserLover View Post
    I presume you used a He-Ne laser to align the ND-YAG laser then an IR viewer to get it lasing and final alignment and walking the mirrors while measuring with an analog laser power meter.
    Hope this helps.
    Thanks for the reply Rick.

    The machine had a HeNe built. The IR viewer was a neat piece of equipment, so was the phosphor block we illuminated with the UV lamp - then saturated it with IR radiation.

    Walking the mirrors was a neat process, especially since I've never done that before!


    The only thing that sucked about the whole process - dressing in a hot clean room suit and wearing IR goggles the entire time (they fog up) but it's better than destroying my eyes.


    Sorry for the blurry photo of the laser! (the orange thing is the q-switch) white block is the flash lamp and rod...


    Next photo is me... Taken 9/19/2006




    Don't mean to hog the thread with photos - but everyone likes looking at lasers!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 091906_HWR004.JPG  

    091906_HWR001.JPG  


  7. #7
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    Hi Phil,

    That ND-YAG head and resonator is quite different from mine. Is that a Lumonics Wafermark inside view ?
    My resonator is 48 Inches long (the Invar rod length)and the head is Stainless Steel and ceramic. Your head looks like a teflon block and ceramic design with a shorter resonator.
    Did you have to use deionised water to cool the head ?
    Nice pics even though one is out of focus.
    Did you frequency double/ triple or quadruple the fundamental lines to get UV ?

    TTYL
    Rick
    Profile Redacted by Admin @ 04.24.2010

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaserLover View Post
    Hi Phil,

    That ND-YAG head and resonator is quite different from mine. Is that a Lumonics Wafermark inside view ?
    My resonator is 48 Inches long (the Invar rod length)and the head is Stainless Steel and ceramic. Your head looks like a Teflon block and ceramic design with a shorter resonator.
    Did you have to use deionized water to cool the head ?
    Nice pics even though one is out of focus.
    Did you frequency double/ triple or quadruple the fundamental lines to get UV ?

    TTYL
    Rick

    I just showed up, dressed in the appropriate clothing and watched my friend do the work.

    I do believe it was far IR - the UV was from a 4" fluorescent tube illuminating the phosphor block so it would glow. The block was saturated with IR and would darken so you could see the beam profile. During this procedure most of the optics were out so the beam was wide and unfocused...about 1/2" in diameter. Still very warm if you moved your hand in front of it. When focused it would start burning things.

    Yes, deionized water was used for cooling....and for washing your hands before entering the clean room. I've never had such clean hands - so oil free...

    And that is the inside of the Wafermark II...the Z80 controller, galvo amps and all the electronics...and the three phase power supply with the bad power adjustment pot are not shown.

    Was it doubled, tripled or quadrupled - I have no idea...


    Thanks though for letting me take up some space and share my day with this laser!


    Phil



    p.s. here are a couple of more photos - notice the wafer with the smiley face.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 091906_HWR002.JPG  

    091906_HWR003.JPG  

    091906_HWR005.JPG  

    091906_HWR006.JPG  

    Last edited by godfrey; 03-03-2008 at 18:06. Reason: Edited because I spelled crap wrong!

  9. #9
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    ARC powered YAG. OMG!. Where did they find this dusty relic
    95% of that ARC goes to UV. Truly as efficient as a steam engine
    I hired an Italian guy to do my wires. Now they look like spaghetti!

  10. #10
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    You would be surprised how many of Arc and Flashlamp powered ND-YAGs are out there doing Industrial and Scientific jobs. They may be inefficient but they do the job. Laser diode pumping might go for 8 to 10 thousand hours but will cost you well over $25,000 to replace the diodes while Arc and Flashlamps will set you back maybe $2,000 for the same lifetime and you can replace them yourself rather than have Lee Laser charge you for it.
    Profile Redacted by Admin @ 04.24.2010

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