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Thread: Blue Lasers Combined?

  1. #1
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    Default Blue Lasers Combined?

    Just purely out of interest this as I don't currently build but has anyone on here tried combining 405nm and 473nm?

    I ask because I know theres a group buy on a dichro for red at the moment for combining 635 and 671 and as blue is the most expensive colour, and with 405nm blue diodes with tec available for as little as 20 with 100mw (150mw diode underdriven for long life), it would seem a sensible combination to try.

    The violet content might possibly make white harder to acheive but on the other hand, I can see the weak violets and other blue dependant shades that are often weak because of low powered 473's due to cost could be boosted in intensity by 405. In fact on the white subject, if some extra means of control could be found, I don't see why 405nm couldn't simply be be turned off to allow white to be achieved if it wasn't achieveable with 405nm in the mix.

    Any thoughts? Anyone tried it / intend trying it?

  2. #2
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    You'll lose power from both blues when you mix them? Is it worth it?

  3. #3
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    I don't know but isn't the average loss on a dichro around 2% for the reflected beam so presumably you'd be losing 2% of 473nm in return for an extra 100mw of 405nm.

  4. #4
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    Not much loss on the reflected beam but a lot of loss on the through beam.

  5. #5
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    Lightbulb

    I wouldn't mind going so fas as to combine two of the 405s to get 200mW or so to add. I gave marconi a filter that was supposed to pass everything above 450ish and reflect everything below, but I am not sure he has messed with it. I think it would be interesting but it may mess up the color pallete a little.
    Love, peace, and grease,

    allthat... aka: aaron@pangolin

  6. #6
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    Cool

    Funny you should mention that, Simon... Semrock has an off-the-shelf dichro that will pass 473 (and 445, for that matter) while reflecting 405. Figure on loosing around 5% of your 473, and a couple percent of the 405. Not sure how much they'll cost though. (Didn't ask about price, just verified that the dichro was available and checked the specs.)

    So yeah, it's possible to mix in some 405 nm blue. Long term, I'd like to try it, but in the short run I want to get 660 and 635 in the same projector first!

    Main problem with 405 is that it's so hard for the human eye to see. So you really need a lot of it to make any difference. Still, I'd like to see what kind of color mixes you could get....

    Adam

  7. #7
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    How much power does it take to see a vividly see a moving 405nm beam in fog? Does anyone know?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by carmangary View Post
    How much power does it take to see a vividly see a moving 405nm beam in fog? Does anyone know?
    My 95mW 405nm seems fairly bright with a little bit of smoke and a straight beam. I'd imagine scanning the beam would dilute it quite a bit. Should look good in a small room with a heavy haze however. I'll test it in a couple of days and come back with info.

    Hey, maybe i should mix some coumarin dye in with my fog juice! Not!

  9. #9
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    Your galvo mirrors aren't coated for UV, I think you'll loose tons there

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by buffo View Post
    Main problem with 405 is that it's so hard for the human eye to see. So you really need a lot of it to make any difference.
    Adam
    If these videos are to be believed, it seems that 405nm is actually quite viewable albeit much dimmer than green as you'd expect:

    Direct spot comparison with a Coherant power meter:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kjLY...eature=related


    405nm Blu Ray projector in sound to light next to an RGY:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DgjhVvJLXk


    Only porblem with projector videos on Youtube is you don't know how much saturation has been added to make things look better. At least the side by side RGY means equal saturation on both.

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