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Thread: Cutting Aluminium

  1. #1
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    Default Cutting Aluminium

    I need to cut my Aluminium plate into sections to make a split level RGB. Might even have some left over for floating tables.
    I'm a bit nervouse about doing this because
    1) I don't have a proper layout in mind
    and
    2) I've only got two wobbley kitchen chairs and a crappy jigsaw from B&Q to cut it with.

    The Alu doesnt have a plastic coating on it and last time I did my marking I used pencil which was really hard to see.

    Any tips on size for two plates?
    Any tips on actually cutting it?

    Thanks guys.
    Graham

  2. #2
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    Default

    if you are trying to cut 1/8" you may be ok. If it is 1/4" take it to a machine shop saw cut, and have the ends milled it will be worth it. Cheap band saws tend to bend and you will never get a straight cut.

  3. #3
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    Default Cutting Aluminum

    ***Warning Don't do this if you feel uncomfortable***


    Aluminum cuts easily with a chop saw and carbide tipped wood blade. That's the way I was shown years ago... If you need to cut it wider than the width of your blade, just flip it over and cut again. Make sure you have the piece clamped down for safety. I've made hundreds of cuts this way over the years.

    I don't think you can cut aluminum with a bandsaw. Have you ever tried to saw it with a hacksaw? Aluminum is so soft it just gums' up the blade.

  4. #4
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    I think it's 0.6mm, if not then it's 0.8mm thick.
    I'm looking on the net to find a local shop...

  5. #5
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    Default Aluminum

    By the way, I've seen my local shop cut 6x6 inch blocks of aluminum with an ordinary wood blade available from Home Depot. Buy the blade with the most teeth.

  6. #6
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    i have a table saw, any suggestions for what blade to use?
    i was thinking like this
    http://www.powertoolsuk.co.uk/webcat...9PM13C&ID=1554
    Last edited by keeperx; 09-30-2008 at 08:36.

  7. #7
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    Get a fine tooth carbide tipped blade and go sloooooooooooowww.

    Yea, the one in the pic should work but if you need t o just do the job once that is probably overkill.

  8. #8
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    i was thnking similar not that one.. 40$ is more than i payed for both my 12"x12" plates
    now this one is a good deal
    https://www.findingking.com/p-19493-...pped-7-14.aspx

  9. #9
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    mixedgas is offline Creaky Old Award Winning Bastard Technologist
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    [QUOTE=carmangary;62399]Get a fine tooth carbide tipped blade and go sloooooooooooowww.

    I used to cut AL to 1" thick all day on a big bandsaw without gumming up, its the matter of using the right blade and a coolent or lubricant if needed. Do clamp the AL down well and go slow if you go the carbide route, I have a small scar on one finger (well 37 stiches) from that going wrong one day when a clamp got loose. It makes a unique fingerprint.

    Steve Roberts

  10. #10
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    Cool

    I cut all the 1/4 inch aluminum plate for my projector using a hand-held electric jigsaw with a standard blade. Like everyone else above has said, go slow and you'll be fine. (Use a file to smooth the sharp edges and corners after you're done.)

    I used a Sharpie marker to draw the cut lines on the aluminum. Much better than pencil. You can always clean it up with acetone later if you change your mind on a cut...

    Adam

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