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Thread: Switching Lasers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Default Switching Lasers

    If you have a small 3 colour laser system which has a small green and red.
    Is it very simple to remove the lasers and fit a bigger units with modulation? Keeping all the original scanning equipment ilda stuff etc?

    I am not very hot with electronics.

  2. #2
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    Pflugerville, TX, USA
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    Default

    It depends. It wouldn't be easy for me because I don't have a lot of spare room and all of my mounts are custom machined.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Cairns, Australia
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    Default

    Yeah it depends how much room you have. A few pics of laser would help.

  4. #4
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    Oct 2008
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    Default

    My son brought me a very heavy Lab Laser Optical Bench for me to do my own custom build from scratch.
    Its measurements is 50cm x 60cm. I have removed the mirrors ready for my equipment.


    I want to use one of my small laser systems for parts.
    Its a 3 colour system and has 20k Galvos in it but its only 30mw green and 60mw red.
    I want to remove all the parts but instead of the little red and green swap the lasers with maybe the Green Laser from the laser world system and buy a high powered red to feed in to make a higher powered 3 colour system.

  5. #5
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    That should work. Electrically, the parts should swap out without problem. Just be aware that you may need to electrially isolate your new lasers from each other.

  6. #6
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    Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by carmangary View Post
    That should work. Electrically, the parts should swap out without problem. Just be aware that you may need to electrially isolate your new lasers from each other.
    What does that mean?

  7. #7
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    It means, that their cases cant somehow be in contact with each other. I personally havent had a problem, but just sitting them on a little sheet of mica will insulate them, but still transfer the heat.

  8. #8
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    Sheepsville, Wales, UK
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    Gary is right its important to ensure electrical isolation. It will depend on your lasers design as some lasers have their cases connected to either the positive power supply rail or the negative supply rail - some however are already insulated. Obviously if you bolt 2 lasers down to a common baseplate (which can, depending on the head design, be important for heat dissipation) and those lasers are not isolated but instead have opposite polarity on thier cases they will be shorted together. As Things said mica can provide electrical insulation while maintaining thermal conductivity. The silicone & fibreglass matting that is used for insulating semiconductors can be bought from some suppliers in sheet form so you can cut to the desired shape and size. This does the same job as Mica but is a bit more 'user friendly'

    Rob
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