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Thread: 200 mw 405nm??

  1. #1
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    Default 200 mw 405nm??

    I am sure that is a pulse rateing of 450 mw's


    http://www.computerworld.com/action/...&intsrc=kc_top

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Default

    not to get anyones hopes up but there has been a recent find of some possible pre production sleds that are being labeled as "12x 405"

    currently a few people from lpf bought some to do some testing.

    im not getting my hopes up but i will keep everyone here updated if they are legit.
    -Josh

  4. #4
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    Default whoa

    from the linked article it says 450mW, can this really be true?

    The laser can emit a beam of 450 milliwatts, which is about double the power of Sanyo's current highest-power laser for Blu-ray Disc systems. The higher power means it can write and read data on discs with up to four data layers and at speeds of up to 12X, Sanyo said today.

    Please let us know if you find out anything more about these babys.


  5. #5
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    Default

    the supplier was incorrect with the power rating. the diodes that were said to be the 12x were less powerful than the phr-803t diodes.

    back to the waiting game
    -Josh

  6. #6
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    Default

    There IS diode that can currently do close to 200mW for sustained periods. The price isn't too bad (around $250) but you need to rip apart a blu-ray burner to get it. It comes from a drive made by LG (part number GGW-H20L). I've built about 4 or 5 lasers using these diodes, all in the range of 180-200mW and none have died during normal use. One was built over 8 months ago, set at 195mW, it is used for a couple hours each day and is still truckin. I'd say this is the best way to go for high power 405. The PHR diodes are great, but they just dont last very long when they are cranked higher than 120mW or so.

  7. #7
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    Default

    200 mW at 405 nm is needed to write Blu-Ray LTH discs at 12x speed. As the manufacturers ramp up the speeds, we should see even more powerful lasers in this frequency. Which is nice

    Even more interesting is the Microvision PicoP. These seem to use really, really small red, green and blue lasers and a two-axis MEMS tilt mirror to produce raster video in a projector about the size of a sugar cube. The red isn't that interesting- it's just a DI diode- but the blue seems to be 440 nm or thereabouts (not violet, but actually blue) and I'm not sure where they'd hide a frequency doubler in that design- it's absolutely tiny- let alone two.

    Hopefully when these things start being mass produced, we'll get the ultra-fast two-axis mirror and the volume push on 440 nm diodes

  8. #8
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    Smile

    There is a direct-doubled blue design out there that Mistubishi was looking at for LaserTV use. Chris Stuart talked about it on the ILDA cruise. It made several watts, and was about the size of a child's building block. (Though the heat sink on the back was huge - 5 inches cubed!)

    The real probled was that the divergence was terrible. Something like 3 to 5 RADIANS (not mrad!) divergence. That wasn't an issue for laser TV, but it sure would be for us...

    Chris had an idea to grow a lens right on the surface of the doubling stage to tame the beam. No idea if he's had any sucess though.

    Adam

  9. #9
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    yeah while 405nm is nice, and the out of spec 408-410nm diodes are even nicer, those laser TV technologies and the direct injection 455nm are going to be the best!

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by heroic View Post
    200 mW at 405 nm is needed to write Blu-Ray LTH discs at 12x speed. As the manufacturers ramp up the speeds, we should see even more powerful lasers in this frequency. Which is nice

    Even more interesting is the Microvision PicoP. These seem to use really, really small red, green and blue lasers and a two-axis MEMS tilt mirror to produce raster video in a projector about the size of a sugar cube. The red isn't that interesting- it's just a DI diode- but the blue seems to be 440 nm or thereabouts (not violet, but actually blue) and I'm not sure where they'd hide a frequency doubler in that design- it's absolutely tiny- let alone two.

    Hopefully when these things start being mass produced, we'll get the ultra-fast two-axis mirror and the volume push on 440 nm diodes
    I was looking into using MEMS, 1D or 2D Microvision doesn't sell development kits (I asked), but I found that Opus Micro out of Taiwan does just released this month for $200! http://www.opusmicro.com.tw/Controller.htm I am more interested in a set of galvos at the moment, but I do want to start playing with MEMS this year! But I think a separate MEMS thread would be better for my babbling on this.

    -Adam
    Support your local Janitor- not solicited .

    Laser (the acronym derived from Light Amplification by Stimulated Emissions of Radiation) is a spectacular manifestation of this process. It is a source which emits a kind of light of unrivaled purity and intensity not found in any of the previously known sources of radiation. - Lasers & Non-Linear Optics, B.B. Laud.

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