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Thread: Network problem - Huge packet loss :(

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Cairns, Australia
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    Default Network problem - Huge packet loss :(

    Hey guys. This only started happening earlier this afternoon. Basically, I noticed my internet being very slow. ie, some websites load fast as usual, and some dont load at all, even though I know they work. I have rebooted my WiFi router and modem, didnt work. I checked my WiFi statistics, and it says that more than double the amount of packets received, have been sent, which indicates there is alot of packets being lost somewhere. I did a ping photonlexicon.com in command prompt, and got

    Pinging photonlexicon.com [67.205.8.92] with 32 bytes of data:

    Request timed out.
    Request timed out.
    Reply from 67.205.8.92: bytes=32 time=923ms TTL=33
    Reply from 67.205.8.92: bytes=32 time=923ms TTL=33

    Ping statistics for 67.205.8.92:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 2, Lost = 2 (50% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 923ms, Maximum = 923ms, Average = 923ms


    + it took about 5 minutes to load this posting page

    Even now, all the smileys havent loaded

    Anyone got anything I can try/ know whats goin on?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default

    Edit button wont work, but I thought I would mention, that this is happening for my brother too, who is on WiFi also. Switching to ethernet cable doesnt seem to help

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default

    try pinging the default gateway (ie your wireless router). see if you still get packet loss.
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  4. #4
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    Default

    Just pinged my WiFi router and the modem, they both respond fine without packet loss. Must mean this is a problem with my connection/the ISP

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
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    Default

    Have you received a letter from your ISP? I got one the other day that explained my speed (or lack there of)

    "Dear valued customer, it appears you have attempted to transmit data through your modem. Here at Somtel, it is our policy to stop all outgoing traffic from client's computers, as it encourages rampant misuse of our outrageously overpriced and under-serviced internet accounts. Please refrain from doing this in future, and thank-you for your continued support of our company."

  6. #6
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    Default

    LOL I know the feelin of overpriced internet, $90AU/month for 1500/256 with a 25GB cap

    But no, no emails.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Hey Things

    Like aijii said, try pinging your DSL gateway address as well, this will determine if its a problem from your house to the carrier.

    If this pings fine then try other local and oversea sites, sometime carriers have upstream or overseas issues

    If you still have ping failures try unplging you modem from the line and reconnecting to make sure it's not a dirty connection

    If this doesn't fix it and you still get bad pings contact yout ISP, or goto bed and see what its like tomorrow

    Troy
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  8. #8
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    When you are pinging, use the continuous ping switch...

    EG. Ping 194.217.85.73 -t

    This will keep pinging until you tell it to stop by pressing CTRL C... 4 pings only will not give the most accurate response as the router has to calculate a route for the first packet which can cause the first one or two packets to fail the test. Also, if the site you are pinging is particularly busy, the router at their end will discard ping packets and continue routing the important stuff...

    You can also try trace route, so tracert 194.217.85.73... This looks for an invalid port number at the destination and uses TTL to find that destination, which will force each router to reply with a TTL Exceeded message and you can see then where the latency or packet loss is occuring...

    Mark

  9. #9
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    You can also try trace route, so tracert 194.217.85.73... This looks for an invalid port number at the destination and uses TTL to find that destination, which will force each router to reply with a TTL Exceeded message and you can see then where the latency or packet loss is occuring...
    Traceroute acually uses a known port number (under linux -33434 to 33534) or ICMP echo request (in Windows)
    If you used an invalid port number you wouldn't know when you've hit the destination, you'd just get a host unreachable response
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  10. #10
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    Sorry, when I say an invalid port number, I mean a port nuber the recieving machine is not likely to be listening to, so not a port used by any other application as per RFC 1700. Traceroute actually uses an incremental range of ports 33434-33534... But these are not valid to any applications like port 25 which is reserved for SMTP..

    Traceroute sends an IP Packet with a TTL value of 1 to the destination system. The first router to handle the packet decreases the TTL value by one and drops the packet. After this happens the router sends an ICMP Time Exceeded message back to your system with it's IP address as the source address. That is how you get the IP of the first router on the way to the destination system.

    Then traceroute sends another packet to the destination system with a TTL value of 2. As it passes through the first router the value is decreased to 1, and is then dropped by the second router it encounters. Which in turn sends it's own ICMP error, giving you the IP address of the second router on the way to the destination system. Traceroute will continue to increase the TTL value by 1 until the destination system is reached.

    Now, when the destination is reached, the final TTL value of 1 will not be discarded and the packet would not be dropped. Traceroute works around this problem by sending UDP packets to the destination system on very high ports that services are not likely to be running on. When the packet can't be received on the designated port, the destination machine will return a ICMP "Port Unreachable" error message. TraceRoute sees that it has received "Port Unreachable" instead of "Time Exceeded" and knows that the destination system has been reached, and the packets stop.

    Traceroute actually sends 3 packets at a time in case the first is ignored in a congested router. You can see this when a traceroute times out often due to a firewall. You will see three stars, one for each packet..

    Cheers
    Mark

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